Pediatric HIV Care and Treatment

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Doing more, faster: Preliminary results from the routine use of point-of-care early infant HIV diagnosis in six sub- Saharan African countries

Issue Briefs

To improve health and to save lives, HIV-infected infants must be diagnosed early, rapidly and efficiently, and immediately initiated on treatment. Yet, current current early infant diagnosis systems in resource- limited countries are challenged at multiple levels of the cascade. 

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Quality Products to Deliver Quality Care: Monitoring the Performance of Point-of-Care Nucleic Acid Testing Manufacturers

Issue Briefs

While coverage of conventional, laboratory-based EID has increased in recent years throughout resource- limited countries, testing could be greatly expanded through the integration of new point-of-care (POC) testing technologies into national EID networks. POC technology ensures that infants are screened on-site, that their caregivers quickly receive their test results and that those who test HIV-positive are rapidly enrolled on lifesaving antiretroviral treatment. 

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At What Price? Cost Considerations for Integrating Point-Of-Care Early Infant HIV Diagnosis into National Diagnostic Networks

Issue Briefs

Infants living with HIV that are not initiated on ART have high mortality rates. This makes early infant diagnosis (EID), prompt return of results and rapid initiation on ART essential.2 Virological testing is the only definitive way to confirm HIV status in infants because of the presence of persisting maternal HIV antibody in children up to 18 months of age. The World Health Organization recommends virological testing at 4–6 weeks of age for HIV-exposed infants and new guidance also states that birth testing may be considered. Ensuring prompt and adequate EID is still a challenge in many HIV endemic countries. Globally, only half of infants born to HIV-infected mothers undergo EID and of these, only half ever receive their test results.

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Voluntary medical male circumcision among adolescents: a missed opportunity for HIV behavioral interventions

Journal Articles

VMMC is one of the first opportunities for adolescent males in African countries to interact with the health care system; HIV counseling at this interaction could maximize HIV prevention opportunities. This study explored male adolescent knowledge around HIV after VMMC and assessed health worker experiences through interviews with 92 VMMC clients (ages 10–19 years) and 33 health providers in South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. Clients in all countries reported that limited information was provided about HIV prevention and care during VMMC. Providers reported spending little time talking about HIV prevention, including condom use. This study identifies this male youth interaction in the health care system as a missed opportunity in furthering prevention of HIV in this population.

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Youth engagement in developing an implementation science research agenda on adolescent HIV testing and care linkages in sub-Saharan Africa

Journal Articles

The Project Supporting Operational AIDS Research (Project SOAR), a United States Agency for the International Development-funded research initiative implemented by EGPAF, led development of a strategic research agenda to improve adolescent HIV care continuum outcomes, including HIV testing and counseling and linkage to care. This involved convening a two-day meeting of 50 experts, including youths living with HIV to review literature, develop research questions and priority areas for program implementation. This article presents the process of involving youth, how they shaped the course of discussions, and the resulting priority research gaps identified at the meeting.

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EGPAF Strategic Plan 2017-2020

Program Tools

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation seeks to end global pediatric HIV/AIDS through prevention and treatment programs, research, and advocacy. Read our Strategic Plan for 2017-2020. 

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Incentives Handbook for Adolescents and Health Care Providers (Kenya)

Program Tools

EGPAF–Kenya designed activities to give incentives to both health care providers and adolescents to engage in health services, informed through discussions with both groups in 20 Children’s Investment Fund Foundation-supported facilities in Homabay County, Kenya. This document incorporates helpful feedback from these key groups.

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Accelerating Children's HIV/AIDS Treatment: Promising Practices and Lessons Learned from the ACT Initiative

Technical Reports

This report shares the promising practices and lessons learned from the Accelerating Children’s HIV/AIDS Treatment (ACT) Initiative. It was informed by a call for inputs, issued to more than 100 implementing partners in nine countries. The report is for local, national, regional, and global stakeholders interested in the design, implementation, funding, and sustainability of HIV care and treatment for children. It can be used in the countries involved in ACT and beyond. 

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Price Transparency: Point-of-Care Early Infant Diagnosis

Issue Briefs

Price transparency is critical to better position countries and implementing partners to access the best prices. Without price transparency, countries and implementing partners face ambiguity in negotiations with manufacturers and distributers for product and service agreements. POC EID price transparency can help ensure access to the best offers for all, thus improving affordability and maximizing patient impact in countries. 

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Democratic Republic of the Congo: Malamu End-of-Project Report

Technical Reports

This publication documents key activities, results, achievements, lessons learned, challenges, and future directions of the Malamu project, implemented by EGPAF in DRC over five years (September 30, 2011 to September 29, 2016). This project was funded by PEPFAR through the CDC and focused on providing PMTCT services, HIV care and treatment, and implementation of Option B+.

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