WWR: One Million Babies Born HIV-Free, Taking a Stand, and Infants and HIV

By Jane Coaston | June 20, 2013

EGPAF Ambassador Tatu Msangi and her daughter Faith (second row, in printed dress) with then-First Lady Laura Bush (in red) at the 2008 State of the Union Address.

The White House

This week, we’re celebrating one million babies born HIV-negative thanks to PEPFAR, learning about why one EGPAF Ambassador traveled to DC to share her story, and thinking about why some babies born to HIV-positive mothers evade the virus, even without medication.

EGPAF – “Celebrating One Million Babies Born HIV-free!” This week, we got some very exciting news. According to the U.S. State Department, as of June 2013, one million babies have been born free of HIV around the world, thanks to the support of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). EGPAF has worked with PEPFAR since its inception ten years ago, and is directly responsible for more than 20 percent of the one million infections averted. In this blog, Johanna Harvey writes about an event honoring the tenth anniversary of PEPFAR and its stunning successes.

Huffington Post – “Ten Years of Helping Orphans and Vulnerable Children Affected by AIDS -- A Celebration of PEPFAR” PEPFAR is focused on the needs of people living with HIV/AIDS around the world. Its strategy focuses not only on care and treatment, but also on the people most often victimized by AIDS: orphans and vulnerable children.  In this blog, author Rachel Yates writes about how PEPFAR is focusing on early childhood development and better meeting the needs of children and families.

EGPAF – “Taking the Stage, and Taking a Stand” EGPAF Ambassador Tatu Msangi had a very busy week. On Monday, she joined U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and other notables to celebrate 10 years of PEPFAR. Tatu, a native of Tanzania, is a registered nurse working to provide support women living with HIV just like her. In this blog post, Tatu talks about how she found out her HIV status and how EGPAF and PEPFAR helped her have a happy, healthy, HIV-free little girl.

Immunological Reviews – “Immunology of pediatric HIV infection” Why do some babies born to HIV-infected mothers evade the virus, and why are others infected? This question has provoked scientists and researchers for decades. In this paper, the authors explain that figuring out how pediatric HIV infection works can help scientists create innovative treatments for children living with HIV – and someday, a cure.

International AIDS Society – “A Day in the Life of Dr. Anja Giphart” As we get closer to this year’s International AIDS Society Conference (generally known as IAS) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the International AIDS Society focused on EGPAF Vice President for Program Implementation Dr. Anja Giphart. In this piece, she shares a typical day in her work, maintaining EGPAF’s HIV/AIDS programming and working with the Foundation’s many offices around the world to improve care and treatment services for millions of women and their families. 

Jane Coaston is Media Relations Coordinator for the Foundation, based in Washington, D.C.