What We’re Reading: Vaccine for HIV, Remembering Elizabeth, and A Sorority’s Fight

By Jane Coaston | September 20, 2013

Elizabeth Glaser and her son, Jake.

EGPAF

This week, we’re learning about new research into a vaccine for HIV, celebrating a sorority’s support for the battle to create an AIDS-free generation, and remembering Elizabeth Glaser.

New York Times – “New Hope for HIV Vaccine” This week, researchers at the Oregon Health & Science University announced a breakthrough in the search for a vaccine for HIV. They were able to test an experimental vaccine that cleared rhesus monkeys of simian immunodeficiency virus, a virus similar to HIV. In this article, New York Times reporter Donald Mcneil, Jr. details the impact of the research and the next steps in developing a HIV vaccine.

EGPAF – “HIV Vaccine on the Horizon?” In this blog post, we’ve rounded up the latest information on the search for a vaccine for HIV, including research performed at the University of Western Ontario that used the “killed virus” technique to develop a vaccine that is now beginning human trials. 

EGPAF – “A Q&A with AEPhi Tulane” AEPhi has been a powerful supporter of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF). In this interview, the leaders of AEPhi at Tulane University share why working with EGPAF is so important to them.

Los Angeles Times – “A Star in the AIDS War: Elizabeth Glaser has become an unlikely but premier lobbyist in the campaign against a killer” More than two decades ago in March of 1990, Los Angeles Times reporter Geraldine Baum interviewed Elizabeth Glaser and wrote this profile of her work getting the attention of lawmakers and researchers in her fight to eliminate pediatric HIV and save the life of her son, Jake.

Huffington Post – “10 Shocking Statistics About Maternal And Child Health” The Huffington Post created a short slideshow about the challenges facing efforts to improve maternal and child health worldwide, including mother-to-child transmission of HIV.


Jane Coaston is Media Relations Coordinator for the Foundation, based in Washington, D.C.