WWR: HIV in China, A Story of Hope, and Flu Shots

By Jane Coaston | January 4, 2013

A woman with her infant care guidelines card in Zimbabwe.

James Pursey/EGPAF

New York Times“In China, Grass-Roots Groups Take On H.I.V./AIDS Outreach Work” In China, there were nearly 69,000 new HIV infections in 2012, an increase of 13 percent over 2011. But grassroots organizations and the Chinese government are beginning to work together to promote prevention efforts and offer care and treatment services to people living with HIV, despite cultural stigma.

EGPAF – “Our Newest Story of Hope” As we kick off the New Year, we’d like to share with you the story of Flora, a young mother living with HIV in Kenya. After learning her status, she learned more about HIV, began taking antiretroviral medications, and is now a peer counselor at an EGPAF-supported prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) program, where she helps other mothers learn how to stay healthy and protect their babies from HIV.

EGPAF – “Using Radio to Bridge the PMTCT Information Gap in Zimbabwe” For many people living with HIV in resource-poor areas, learning how to stay healthy and prevent HIV transmission is a challenge. In Zimbabwe, EGPAF worked with local officials to create a 13-week radio show that shared information on PMTCT, the importance of early antenatal care, and care and treatment for people living with HIV.

Philadelphia Inquirer“Research supports high-dose flu vaccine for people with HIV” Because of their compromised immune systems, people living with HIV/AIDS are significantly more susceptible to contagious illnesses, including the flu. This week, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania released a study indicating that people living with HIV given a quadruple-dose flu vaccine originally intended for the elderly are better protected from the flu.

Jane Coaston is Media Relations Coordinator for the Foundation, based in Washington, D.C.