What We’re Reading:  Charting a Path toward HIV Elimination, Together

By EGPAF | February 14, 2014

Around the world women living with HIV and their children are impacted by the decisions of their governments and its partners. Today, we're reading how those decisions can work in concert.

Georgina Goodwin/Kenya

This week we’re reading how our efforts to end the spread of HIV are working in concert. From new programs that encourage the use of condoms, to The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) new project that reduces stigma and complacency through activism, we’re learning how we can work together to bring about an AIDS-free generation.

AllAfrica.com“Zambia and Swaziland Develop Roadmap to Change Behavior in Response to HIV” – Both Zambia and Swaziland have one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in sub-Saharan Africa. In an effort to reduce new HIV infections, both countries will begin implementing new strategies that attempt to insight behavioral changes through campaigns encouraging condom use. 

Al Jazeera“In Pictures: India’s drug-resistant TB Crisis” – HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) co-infection is common, but a fierce strain of drug-resistant TB is complicating India’s battle against the disease.

EGPAF“CDC’s Let’s Stop HIV Together” --  The CDC’s new campaign “Let’s Stop HIV Together” uses activism and personal stories to address two of the major obstacles to preventing HIV in the United States --  stigma and complacency.

The Washington Post“The Global AIDS Response can Help Fight Hepatitis C”  -- Paul Farmer, M.D., a professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University, explains how the global response to the AIDS pandemic led to a “delivery decade” that dramatically curbed the spread of the virus. Farmer argues that a  similar response can be tailored to tackling other diseases, like Hepatitis C.

EGPAF “Our Voices in the Fight: Empowering Youth” -- In our latest installment of the “Our Voices in the Fight” series, EGPAF sits down for a Q&A with Angel Brown, senior program manager for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (GLBTQ) health and rights at Advocates for Youth.  Read on to learn Angel’s take on how HIV/AIDS impacts minority teenagers in Washington, D.C.