Toward a Global Partnership for an AIDS-Free Generation

A candle is lit during an AIDS memorial in Yerevan, Armenia.

Trygve Utstumo / CC BY-NC-SA

Healthy Means is an online conversation hosted to showcase new ideas and ways we can work together to expand health care and live better lives. In this blog, originally published on Devex.com, Catherine Connor, EGPAF’s director for public policy and advocacy, discusses the importance of global partnerships to improve treatment options for children living with HIV and help achieve an AIDS-free generation.

Over 30 years into the HIV and AIDS epidemic, the need to work together to solve the sometimes monumental challenges the disease presents is without question. The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation has witnessed first-hand the exponential impact of bringing together the resources, experience, ideas, and capacity of many to build a multi-national, multi-sectoral global HIV and AIDS response.

The global health community must continue to forge dynamic partnerships of every shape and size, between nongovernmental organizations, the private and public sector, country governments, and international bodies to address the myriad obstacles and barriers that lay ahead of us on the road to the end of AIDS — particularly when it comes to ending AIDS in children.

During our 25-year history, EGPAF has been committed to working together with a host of public and private sector partners to realize the best outcomes for children, families, and communities affected by HIV and AIDS. Truthfully, EGPAF would not be the global organization it is today, working in 15 countries around the world to end AIDS in children, without our partners. We suspect that many of our partners might say the same about us.

Read the full article, Toward a global partnership for an AIDS-free generation, on Devex.com